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#1 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:13 PM


Rajasthan

These paintings are exquisite works of Rajasthani/Mughal painting done on marble. Rajasthani painting is a style of miniature painting very similar to Mughal paintings.

Mughal painting evolved in India during the reigns of the Mughal emperors (16th - 18th century) while Rajasthani painting evolved mainly in the independent Hindu states of Rajasthan during the same period. Mughal paintings generally focused on secular themes including depiction of the emperor and his court, flora and fauna.

Rajasthani paintings, on the other hand, following popular wave of devotionalism among the Hindus depicted legends of Hindu epics such as Lord Krishna and Radha; other difference came from their bolder use of color and ornamental treatment of landsca

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#2 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:15 PM


Rajasthani Turbans are known for their beauty and elegance, they are an essential part of traditional outfit and is still worn in small towns and villages of Rajasthan.

The Turban, variously called pagari, pencha, sela , or safa, depending on style, an angrakhi or achakan as upper garment, and Indian or pyjamas as the lower garment make up the male outfit.

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#3 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:16 PM

Turban Styles:

It has been estimated that there are approximately one thousand different styles and types of turbans in Rajasthan, various styles of turbans denote region and caste. These variations are by different names such as pagari and safa. A pagari is usually 82 feet long and 8 inches wide. A safa is shorter and broader. The common man wears turbans of one color, while the elite wear designs and colors according to the occasion.

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#4 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:17 PM

Tying the Turban:

Achieving the different styles with just a length of material requires great skill.

Specialists in this art, called pagribands, were employed by the royal courts, but Rajasthanis generally take pride in practicing and perfecting the art of turban-tying themselves.

A safa is much more than just an item of headgear to protect the wearer from the sun's heat.

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#5 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:18 PM


By its shape, color and size you can tell a great deal about the man, such as where he comes from , what he does for his living, and his position in the society. A safa is about30 feet long and about 4 feet wide. It was traditionally considered an essential part of a man's clothing, and to appear in public without one was a sign of grossly bad behavior. The color, pattern, and style of tying a turban vary according to community, region and even district. Thus it is said that the dialect of men's turbans changes every 12 miles in Rajasthan. Some colors and patterns are seasonal, such as the white and red falguniya turban that is worn in the spring. Other signify family circumstances ; for instance, the dotted chunri pattern or bright colors signify a marriage or the birth of a child.

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#6 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:20 PM


On the other hand, colors like dark blue, maroon or khaki signify a death in the family. Wearing the wrong type of turban under the wrong circumstances can make you an object of ridicule.

Some of the turbans are also called by the cloth by which it is tied , like pachrangi turban is made of a five different coloured chunri cloth and then jari turbans are there made by the cloth of jari and silk , it is generally worn on formal occasions of marriage along with Sherwani or Jodhpuri suits with heavy beautiful embriodery patterns on them.

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#7 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:24 PM


Trend-setting Turban :

Each region of Rajasthan takes great pride in its own distinctive way of tying a turban. The people of Jodhpur, however , claim that the Jodhpuri turban is superior to all the rest, pointing to the fact that it has been adopted by trend-setters all over Rajasthan , from Bikaner to Jaipur

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#8 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:28 PM


More arts (paintings) from Rajasthan.

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#9 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:29 PM


Painting on Royal meeting:

A Royal princess comes to meet her friend (sakhi) in the dark moonlight. The people of India spend their night outside in the hot day of summer. They are seated on an open place in a garden. A lady attendant is serving wine to the princess. A lady musician is playing music on tambura. Another lady attendant fans the princess standing behind them. The small ponds of water are full with flower of roses for fragrance.

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#10 Rainka_Shivani

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Posted 15 January 2005 - 06:32 PM


Paintings of Ragaputra Megha Malhar

In most Ragamalas Megha is the fifth or Sixth male raga. Megha, like Vasant pictures the Krishna among maidens. In Vasant the reason for rejoicing was the coming of spring and blooming. Here the arrival of the rainy season, which will break the stupendous heat, is celebrated. Megha means, “Rain cloud”. The four ladies attendants are standing near him. One serving betel, second playing tambura, third playing dholak and fourth playing cymbal in her hand. Krishna standing with veena in his hand.

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