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The Real Reasons People Apply to Medicine.


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#1 swaphaj

swaphaj

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Posted 04 May 2009 - 02:47 AM

Medicine is not challenging. Medicine is not fun. Medicine is not exciting. These opinions may or not be mine and you can agree or disagree with them if you want, but my point is that they should be not used as an arguement in this case. I wouldn't want a doctor that cares more about how fun a surgical procedure is than my life on the line and neither should you.

People who choose medicine as a course are cowards. There are few people deserving of the education given in my eyes and these are the people that I admire and respect to no end. How many people reading this I wonder are considering or even hold places in medical school merely because they grew up in a family full of healthcare professionals and it was expected of them? How many recieved excellent science grades and chose medicine not because they truly wanted to do it, but because it was seen as the most ambitious option. Don't know what to do with your life? Choose medicine. Medicine is the easy way out. Compared to studying another course at university its like riding a train to a set destination compared to being a plane pilot with a million runways to land on. A scary thought for many people is not knowing what will become of their lives. A medical degree offers an easy solution.

When we get into medical school, we like to pretend that the work is difficult, that we're working all the time, that we're struggling to make ends meet, but you know what? Most of us aren't. Of course there are a few people who geniunely find the work difficult, can't cope with the financial side of things and can't find time to destress. But they're the minority. We like to pretend we've got it hard. We like to act as if we haven't been given a life and career that will ensure security through life in the upper bracket of society. Almost like we feel guilty and that we don't deserve the opportunity. Some of us don't. The filtering process involved lets people who in my opinion are unsuited to medicine through whilst some of the most intelligent and caring people are cast aside.

Other than ease, what draws people to medicine then? Power? Maybe. Respect? Maybe. Money? Maybe. Caring about people? No. If I was to rank where caring about actual patients and people came into people's decisions to choose medicine as a career I'd place it pretty low. More important to them is the appearance of caring about people. I have no respect for a lot of GPs. People who want to go into general practice are most likely to be guilty of offending my sensitive sense of righteousness. I'm not saying that all GPs are horrible people, or indeed that any of them are. Some of them chose medicine and general practice for noble and honerable reasons and I salute these men and women as they are truly pillars of society. I don't want to be a general practitioner, but I can think of a few amazing reasons as to why it did tempt me.

In medicine, you see people go in and out of your clinic. You see so many people everyday. I can imagine how after a while you stop seeing them as people and just see them as diseases to treat. In general practice, you get to see families grow. You be there when a new family is started, and have to be there when the time comes to write the death certificate. Supporting and watching a family grow would be such a rewarding experience. Almost like you're a part of that family. Call my reason stupid and naiive if you want. To me I can think of no better reason to want to be a GP.

The reasons why people choose to be a GP these days are simple. Money and good working hours. Sure, thats fine you say. Why not? Everyone needs a life. Everyone does need a life, but to some people being a GP would make their life, would be their life. Denying these people their opportunities are the people who want to coast through gaining as much respect and money for as little work as possible.

We're told that saying that caring about people is the wrong thing to say in the interview. I argue that it is the only thing that I would require a candidate to truly feel in their heart once they have gained the chance to get into a medical school.

I'm asking you now. Honestly, Why do you want to study medicine? I'm not going to deter you from your choice, whatever you say. But don't lie to yourself.


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