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Why is the incidence of cataract so high in Nepal?


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#1 santos

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 09:41 AM

http://news.biocompare.com/newsstory.asp?id=88184

The above website might give some of the answer. However, it is as common in men as in women, so I don't think solid fuel in unflued stoves is a very big factor although it might have some contribution in the development of cataract by catalysing the growth.

Some of you with little knowledge of eyecare in Nepal might be surprised to know that cataract (motibindu), which can be treated by a simple surgery is the commonest cause of blindness in Nepal. The second most commonest cause of blindness/visual impairment is refractive error, which again can be cured just by wearing glasses of the right power.

#2 MohanTara

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Posted 19 July 2005 - 03:34 PM

Thanks Santos bro 4 that information. smile.gif
I feel that the government in Nepal lacks public awareness
In areas such as u have mention above as well as
in many more like Aids, etc..
We need 2 learn,
teach from 1 another.
Ideas are nothing if not shared. smile.gif

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#3 sunil

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 08:31 AM

Yes, you are right that very simple looking diseases / illnesses are taking away lives of thousands of people and causing profound human morbidity in the developing countries.

Thousands of children are dying only from vitamin A deficiency disorders, Iron deficiency anaemia, Iodine deficiency disorders and protein energy malnutrition. All of them are easily preventable provided the people have some knowledge on balanced diet and good nutrition. People prefer to eat a packet of WAI WAI or MAYOS instead of 100 gm of Soyabean, which can provide them with necessary amount of proteins and other nutrients for a day.

This is due to lack of education and poverty as well. I can see poor people getting their limbs amputated only because they can not afford treatment of a simple wound or other medical condition. Lack of awareness, carelessness, gender biasness are other important factors. So education, generation of source of income, easy access to health centres and timely availability of medicines in the health centres are very important. Its infact a very huge issue.

Whereas, regarding the cataract due to exposure to biomass fuel smoke, the risk is there, but minimum. There are many other diseases of respiratory tract and other systems that need to be addressed primarily rather than cataract in relation with smoke. If you see the Odds Ratio (OR), there is a very small risk, i.e. 1.23. It should not be a problem.
Sunil Kumar Joshi
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#4 distant_memory

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 10:30 AM

QUOTE(sunil @ Jul 20 2005, 08:31 AM)
This is due to lack of education and poverty as well. I can see poor people getting their limbs amputated only because they can not afford treatment of a simple wound or other medical condition. Lack of awareness, carelessness, gender biasness are other important factors. So education, generation of source of income, easy access to health centres and timely availability of medicines in the health centres are very important. Its infact a very huge issue.

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hmm it's quite interesting how you've linked lack of education of proper diet to poverty when that really isn't the case. i think its more cultural. lets look at our diet...it consists of bhat, aalu, roti, gundruk, tama, acchar, dal and tarakari. how much oil is present in the tarakari...lots and the masu too...it usually tends to be swimming in the tel...and all the masala and kursani can't be good for the system too. the achar/ gundruk/ tama is fermented and bad for us...could possibly lead to liver failures due to the fungus that might be present in them and well as for bhat and aalu...same food group. people don't tend to have a balanced diet regardless of financial status. also the diet doesnt tend to change which ever country we live in...cause east or west dhal bhat remains the best, so once again culture plays a role in our eating habits. the health ministry in nepal doesnt tend to promote healthy eating either...though aayo nun ko add was quite good with the whole iodine stuff...but in general the 5 fuits and vege a day thing isn't very clear, nor is the idea of different food groups and the advantages and disadvantages and the quantity required of each group, people just don't know what they should and shouldn't. the government here in the Uk are promoting 5 fruits/ vege a day as well exercising...with obesity being on the rise.

also did people know that fruits and veges have enough salt in them for the body to function normally. i was really surprised just how much salt intake us people have...which is probably one of the leading causes of why hypertension is quite high in nepal.

Edited by distant_memory, 20 July 2005 - 10:50 AM.

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#5 santos

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 10:51 AM

Sunil,

I appreciate your concern that there are other more important diseases which cause mortility, not only just morbidity and all these could be prevented by just changing the eating habbits, personal hygiene, basic education or preventive/primary care. Saying all that, I don't think causes which are considered relatively low-risk can be ignored because even at a OR of 1:23, there is a 4.35% risk. For someone i.e. 1 in every 23 women, it will still be a problem.

#6 santos

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 11:04 AM

DM,

The diet actually helps the people of the mountanious terrian. http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7530
The physical efficiency increases because of the high carbohydrate (alu, rice) intake.

In spite of all this, I can say from my personal experience that a balanced diet is very essential. After arriving here, I was sent to see the dietician at the hospital because my GP thought my diet was not proper. I can feel the massive difference that visit to the dietician has made to my eating pattern and more importantly, on my health. In fact, I've even put up a balanced diet chart on my notice board.

#7 distant_memory

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 11:06 AM

i've quoted the wrong paragrapgh... amended post is as such!

QUOTE(sunil)
Thousands of children are dying only from vitamin A deficiency disorders, Iron deficiency anaemia, Iodine deficiency disorders and protein energy malnutrition. All of them are easily preventable provided the people have some knowledge on balanced diet and good nutrition. People prefer to eat a packet of WAI WAI or MAYOS instead of 100 gm of Soyabean, which can provide them with necessary amount of proteins and other nutrients for a day.
hmm it's quite interesting how you've linked lack of education of proper diet to poverty when that really isn't the case. i think its more cultural. lets look at our diet...it consists of bhat, aalu, roti, gundruk, tama, acchar, dal and tarakari. how much oil is present in the tarakari...lots and the masu too...it usually tends to be swimming in the tel...and all the masala and kursani can't be good for the system too. the achar/ gundruk/ tama is fermented and bad for us...could possibly lead to liver failures due to the fungus that might be present in them and well as for bhat and aalu...same food group. people don't tend to have a balanced diet regardless of financial status. also the diet doesnt tend to change which ever country we live in...cause east or west dhal bhat remains the best, so once again culture plays a role in our eating habits. the health ministry in nepal doesnt tend to promote healthy eating either...though aayo nun ko add was quite good with the whole iodine stuff...but in general the 5 fuits and vege a day thing isn't very clear, nor is the idea of different food groups and the advantages and disadvantages and the quantity required of each group, people just don't know what they should and shouldn't. the government here in the Uk are promoting 5 fruits/ vege a day as well exercising...with obesity being on the rise.

also did people know that fruits and veges have enough salt in them for the body to function normally. i was really surprised just how much salt intake us people have...which is probably one of the leading causes of why hypertension is quite high in nepal.

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Walk a mile in my shoes!


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#8 MohanTara

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 11:27 AM

What u eat affects ur well being....
well, thats true but alas '
not every1 have the choice
2 eat only the nutritious food! sad.gif

There are many reasons 2 this:
Born poor n living poorly,
work in a job that does not allow you 2 eat well,
living in a country savaged by war...etc..

The enjoyment of food is
Of course, a part of the good life n
should be done as one could afford 2 do so.
However, it pays 2 be aware of the
consequences of poor or bad diet be4 they appear.

General health has more than 1-dimension than eating.
Suitable and regular exercises,
medical checkups regularly n
treatment as soon as indicated all contribute 2
the quallity if not the quantity of ones life.
Of course some may chose 2 eat unhealthy by choice
N despite that live 2 a 100years old or more..
blink.gif ohmy.gif ph34r.gif

I believe in eating food in good company is,
Not only a social experience,
but also a spiritual one. smile.gif

Edited by MohanTara, 20 July 2005 - 11:29 AM.

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#9 ashis

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Posted 20 July 2005 - 02:40 PM

Hmmmm........Interesting Discussion about our Dietary habits.I presume that most of the People in Nepal donot get Enough Balanced Diet.But people in cities like kathmandu..have a full balanced diet with Vegetable ,rice ,Meat and Pulses.It is only in the Problem of rural areas.
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#10 sunil

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Posted 24 July 2005 - 05:49 AM

QUOTE(distant_memory @ Jul 20 2005, 11:06 AM)
i've quoted the wrong paragrapgh... amended post is as such!

QUOTE(sunil)
Thousands of children are dying only from vitamin A deficiency disorders, Iron deficiency anaemia, Iodine deficiency disorders and protein energy malnutrition. All of them are easily preventable provided the people have some knowledge on balanced diet and good nutrition. People prefer to eat a packet of WAI WAI or MAYOS instead of 100 gm of Soyabean, which can provide them with necessary amount of proteins and other nutrients for a day.
hmm it's quite interesting how you've linked lack of education of proper diet to poverty when that really isn't the case. i think its more cultural. lets look at our diet...it consists of bhat, aalu, roti, gundruk, tama, acchar, dal and tarakari. how much oil is present in the tarakari...lots and the masu too...it usually tends to be swimming in the tel...and all the masala and kursani can't be good for the system too. the achar/ gundruk/ tama is fermented and bad for us...could possibly lead to liver failures due to the fungus that might be present in them and well as for bhat and aalu...same food group. people don't tend to have a balanced diet regardless of financial status. also the diet doesnt tend to change which ever country we live in...cause east or west dhal bhat remains the best, so once again culture plays a role in our eating habits. the health ministry in nepal doesnt tend to promote healthy eating either...though aayo nun ko add was quite good with the whole iodine stuff...but in general the 5 fuits and vege a day thing isn't very clear, nor is the idea of different food groups and the advantages and disadvantages and the quantity required of each group, people just don't know what they should and shouldn't. the government here in the Uk are promoting 5 fruits/ vege a day as well exercising...with obesity being on the rise.

also did people know that fruits and veges have enough salt in them for the body to function normally. i was really surprised just how much salt intake us people have...which is probably one of the leading causes of why hypertension is quite high in nepal.

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Dear,
That is what I want to say. That is the reason, people in Nepal needs health education on nutrition and balanced diet. We do not consume balance diet irrespective of our financial status. Poor people are suffering from more protein energy malnutrition and rich people are developing more cardivascular diseases and daibetes due to obesity.

People with financial constraints are prone to develop more nutritional related disorders as poverty is their main barrier. They will think about balanced diet when they do not have to worry what to eat next time. Despite of that, if they know little bit about nutrition, what food is more more beneficial for our health; may improve their nutritional status a little bit.

You have corectly pointed out cultural practices. That is why we need health education, to correct different cultural malpractices through education. It is not necessary to stick to our cultural practices if they are harmful.
Sunil Kumar Joshi
WNSO - Nepal, Kathmandu

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