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Blood test to detect heart disease risk in diabeti


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#1 sajan

sajan

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Posted 06 December 2002 - 10:21 AM

Blood test to detect heart disease risk in diabetics

Heart disease is the most frequent, costly and severe complication of diabetes, affecting more than 70 per cent of diabetic patients. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the risk of diabetic heart disease that cannot be fully explained by differences in conventional heart disease risk factors.

However, using a simple blood test, researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have identified a gene that determines which diabetes patients are at greater risk for developing heart disease. Unlike other recent breakthroughs, such as the test for C-reactive protein, the test for this gene needs to be administered only once in a patient's lifetime.

There are two forms of this predictive gene and they are present in approximately equal frequencies in the general population and in diabetics. Diabetics with one type of the gene have a five-fold greater risk of developing heart disease than those with the other form of the gene.

"If we can accurately determine which people with diabetes are at greatest risk for heart disease with a genetic test, we could save lives of many with early intervention techniques", said Dr Andrew P Levy from the Technion Faculty of Medicine, who headed the research.

Levy and his colleagues examined the genetic makeup of individuals in a sample from the Strong Heart Study, a population-based longitudinal study of heart disease in Native Americans, a group previously thought to be resistant to developing heart disease but are now suffering from the disease in large numbers.

The sample group included 206 individuals with heart disease and 206 control cases aged 45-74. Using stored blood samples, the researchers looked at haptoglobin, a blood protein found in three different forms: 2-2, 1-1 and 2-1. Individuals with the 2-2 form were five times more likely to have heart disease than those with the 1-1 form. An intermediate risk was associated with those with the 2-1 form.

"This is an entirely novel and new idea that will certainly attract attention from many clinical investigators and scientists worldwide", said Dr Myron L Weisfeldt, director, Department of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions.

The current study also builds on previous work by Dr Levy, which reported on the association of the haptoglobin gene and other complications of diabetes such as kidney and eye damage.
With warm regards and best compliments !


Sajan
E-mail : sspinya@yahoo.com
"Anti-nepotism as well as anti-baisness are mandatory to be a vaild socio- organisation or charity"




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